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12 Amazing BIRTH FLOWERS & BEST BIRTHDAY FLOWER TATTOO IDEAS

by Tori Jones
Birth Flower Tattoo

What’s up, blossom enthusiasts? It’s your favorite ink slinger here, offering another dive into the divine world of body art. Buckle up, buds, and get ready to bloom because we’re rolling up our sleeves and digging into the fertile soil of birth flower tattoos.

You might be scratching your heads, thinking, “Hold up, I’ve heard of birthstones, but birth flowers? What’s this all about?” Glad you asked!

Just like birthstones, each month has its corresponding flower, which symbolizes specific qualities and virtues. This is a phenomenal way to make your tattoo a deeply personal reflection of who you are. Not to mention, it’s a conversation starter. Trust me, nothing sparks chit-chat at parties like a well-placed aster or chrysanthemum tattoo.

January: Carnation

Carnation Tattoo
@vane.tattoo_ Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

Kick-starting the year, we have the carnation. This punchy bloom is a symbol of love, fascination, and distinction. From the intricate petals to the variety of colors it comes in, the carnation tattoo can be a versatile and striking choice. Consider a hyper-realistic carnation in full bloom or maybe a minimalist line art tattoo for a more subtle approach.

February: Violet

Violet Tattoo
@bryan.gee Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

Violets, the birth flower for February, symbolize loyalty and faithfulness. Tattoos of this petite flower are perfect for those who appreciate the beauty in the subtle. Violets look fabulous when inked in deep purple hues, or when styled in a delicate watercolor design.

March: Daffodil

Daffodil Tattoo
@_rony_tattoo Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

Daffodils, my friends, are the epitome of rebirth and new beginnings. And honestly, what’s more tattoo-esque than embracing change and renewal? March babies, your daffodil tats could be a bright splash of yellow or a more monochromatic piece. Either way, you’re carrying a symbol of joy and vitality with you.

April: Daisy

Daisy Tattoo
@tilda_tattoo Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

April is all about daisies, baby. Symbolizing innocence and purity, daisy tattoos can range from simple, delicate outlines to full-color masterpieces, maybe intertwined with a quote that speaks to your soul.

May: Lily of the Valley

Lily of the Valley Tattoo

Oh, the sweet lily of the valley. Symbolizing humility and sweetness, this flower is for you May-born folks. Imagine a cascading lily of the valley tattoo trailing down your arm or back, each tiny bell-shaped bloom meticulously detailed. A sight to behold, for sure.

June: Rose

Rose Tattoo
@juliaavoo Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

For June, we’ve got the queen of flowers: the rose. Symbolizing love and passion, there’s a reason rose tattoos are timeless. Whether it’s a classic black and grey, vibrant red, or even a stylized geometric design, roses never disappoint.

July: Water Lily

Water Lily Tattoo
@helen.tattoos Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

July is all about the water lily. Symbolizing purity and majesty, water lily tattoos are for those who want to stand out in a crowd. A watercolor style works wonders with this flower, letting those colors flow and merge like they’re floating on a pond.

August: Gladiolus

Gladiolus Tattoo
@omgitsliza Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

For August, we have the gladiolus, symbolizing strength and moral integrity. Picture a tall, proud gladiolus inked down your forearm or calf, each petal a testament to your inner fortitude.

September: Aster

Aster Tattoo
@small.tattoos Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

September’s aster symbolizes wisdom and faith. With its star-like petals, an aster tattoo is for those who aren’t afraid to shine. An old-school, traditional aster tat can be a stunner.

October: Marigold

Marigold Tattoo
@handitrip Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

Marigolds are the stars of October, symbolizing warmth and creativity. If vibrant orange and gold hues are your thing, then a marigold tattoo will be right up your alley.

November: Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum Tattoo
@brianriggstattoos Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

For November, we’ve got chrysanthemums, symbolizing longevity and joy. A detailed, full-color chrysanthemum tattoo can be a real show-stopper. It’s a chance to make a statement about your celebration of life.

December: Narcissus

Narcissus Tattoo
@frommay_tat Via Instagram – Love this design? Want your tattoo to look brighter? Try Tattoo Balm

Last but not least, December’s narcissus symbolizes sweetness and self-esteem. Narcissus tattoos can range from minimalist line art to intricate, hyper-realistic designs. A touch of vibrant yellow ink could really make this bloom pop on your skin.

Remember, folks, while the meanings of these flowers can add depth to your tattoo, the ultimate decision is up to you. Choose a design and style that resonates with your personality and aesthetic. At the end of the day, your tattoo is your story, written in ink on the canvas of your skin.

This ink-slinger’s signing off for now. May your tattoos always be in bloom, and remember, there’s no thorn too sharp to deter a true flower lover!

History of Birth Flowers

Today, we’re diving even deeper into the captivating world of birth flowers, tracing their roots back through time, and exploring their cultural significance across societies. It’s a story of symbolism and identity, of mystery and romance, and you’re about to find out how it’s all been stitched into the rich tapestry of human history.

The origin of floriography, the language of flowers, can be traced back to various ancient cultures. Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Chinese — each of them had a unique way of attributing meaning to different flowers.

In ancient Egypt, for instance, the Lotus, with its petals spreading wide in the morning and retracting at night, symbolized rebirth and the sun. It was often depicted in the hieroglyphics that adorned the walls of temples and tombs. Just like how a tattoo might tell a personal story today, these ancient drawings narrated tales of their civilization.

Meanwhile, the Greeks and Romans, deeply entrenched in mythology and nature worship, saw flowers as sacred symbols linked to their gods. The tale of Narcissus, who turned into a flower after falling in love with his own reflection, is one such example. It led to the association of Narcissus, December’s birth flower, with self-love and introspection.

Moving over to the East, the Chinese also had a rich tradition of flower symbolism. For them, each flower was linked with a particular spiritual attribute. Chrysanthemums, for instance, were symbols of longevity and vitality, a belief echoed in the ancient Chinese city of Tongxiang’s annual chrysanthemum festival.

However, it was during the 17th century in Turkey that floriography really bloomed. The people started using flowers to express emotions that were otherwise socially unacceptable to vocalize, an encrypted language that let them speak in hushed whispers.

Later, during the Victorian era, the concept of birth flowers was introduced. Each month was linked with a particular flower, each carrying its unique meaning. From the carnations of January, symbolizing admiration and deep love, to the chrysanthemums of November, standing for cheerfulness and friendship, each birth flower offered a personal symbol to those born in its month.

Conclusion

In conclusion, birth flower tattoos provide an intriguing fusion of the personal and the artistic, merging symbolism and aesthetics to craft a truly unique story on your skin. The placement of your tattoo can significantly enhance its appeal and personal meaning. Common areas include the arms, back, and legs, but truly, there is no limit to where these blooms can blossom on your body. It’s a choice that depends entirely on your comfort, lifestyle, and how prominently you wish to display your inked artwork.

As for cost, this too varies widely, depending on factors such as the size, complexity of the design, and the rates of the studio or artist you choose. A smaller, simpler design might set you back a couple hundred bucks, while a larger, more detailed piece can easily run into the thousands.

However, while tattoos can be an expressive and transformative experience, it’s essential to approach them with a healthy dose of realism. There are potential side effects such as pain during the process, temporary swelling or redness, and in some cases, allergic reactions or infections. Moreover, tattoos are, for all intents and purposes, permanent, so thoughtful consideration should go into the decision.

Finally, remember that getting a tattoo should be a fulfilling, empowering experience. Therefore, do your homework: research your artist, studio, and design well. As the adage goes, ‘Good tattoos aren’t cheap, and cheap tattoos aren’t good.’ The fusion of personal symbolism with artistic aesthetic is a delightful journey, a celebration of life and self-identity through the language of flowers. After all, as Shakespeare so succinctly put it, “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” even if it’s inked into your skin.

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